Jan Grulich

Refreshed UI for Fedora Media Writer

For those who don’t know, Fedora Media Writer is a tool to create bootable live USB drive with your favorite flavor of Fedora. It is written in C++ with UI written in QML and it is supported on Linux, Windows and Mac OS X. It was developed by Martin Bříza, my former collegue from Red Hat, who did an amazing job in the past. Fedora Media Writer (FMW) primarily targets Fedora Workstation and therefore the UI looks like a GNOME app using Adwaita theme. Unfortunately the Adwaita theme changed over time and originally FMW was written using QtQuickControls 1 (deprecated these days) so it needed an UI overhaul.

I started working on FMW during the summer, slowly migrating it to QtQuickControls 2. The original UI had lots of custom QML widgets, basically standard widgets with Adwaita skin on it. I still wanted FMW to use Adwaita theme, because Qt doesn’t have any native QML components for Windows, Mac OSX or GNOME and writing those would require lots of work. Therefore I decided to write a new QQC2 based Adwaita theme which can be used on all platforms. To avoid duplicating half of the code we already have in Adwaita-qt (a QStyle to make QWidgets look like Adwaita), like information about widget sizes and colors, I reworked Adwaita-qt to provide a library so it can be used by projects like this and so they don’t need to update everytime Adwaita changes. It was more work than I anticipated because it needed quite a lot of changes to separate things into library and also to make it build and work on all platforms where I want to use FMW. Good news is that the work is now done and I made a pre-release of Adwaita-qt. The library for now provides information about widget sizes, color palette and colors used by all widgets, but I plan to extend this in future with addition of Adwaita-qt rendering part allowing the library to render basic widgets for you. That’s something I would like to use for example in QGnomePlatform (GNOME platform theme) to render buttons in window decorations. With a lot of information being already said about Adwaita-qt, the work on QQC2 Adwaita theme was an interesting experience and probably the most enjoyable one, because everytime you write a new component and port the app to use it, you see the result of your work and the app slowly migrating towards a more modern UI makes you happy with the result. I don’t know what more to say about the QQC2 Adwaita theme as it’s basically QML variant of widgets we have in Adwaita-qt, with difference that it should look exactly the same on all platforms thanks to using Adwaita-qt. In past with QQC1 all the colors were derived from system QPalette making it slightly different on all platforms. If you wonder why the QQC2 theme is not part of Adwaita-qt, where it will most likely end up, then it’s because it’s not complete yet and contains only components used in FMW itself. Anyway, I have finished the port to QQC2 this week with some late fixes and after I spent a week updating all build systems (Windows, Github CI, Mac OSX) to properly build and produce builds for you to test since I made a new pre-release yesterday \o/.

The work on this port is most likely not 100% finished as I expect some minor issues to appear here and there, but I tried to make this 1:1 copy of the previous version so don’t expect any major changes. I will be glad if you try it and let me know what you think. Thank you and especially big thanks goes to Martin Bříza for his help during the development and for the work he did on this project in the past.

You can get it from following locations:

Here you have some images for comparison:

Cute Qt applications in Fedora Workstation

Fedora Workstation is all about Gnome and it has been since the beginning, but that doesn’t mean we don’t care about Qt applications, the opposite is true. Many users use Qt applications, even on Gnome, mainly because many KDE/Qt applications don’t have adequate replacement written in Gtk or they are just used to them and don’t really have reason to switch to another one.

For Qt integration, there is some sort of Gnome support in Qt itself, which includes a platform theme reading Gnome configuration, like fonts and icons. This platform theme also provides native file dialogs, but don’t expect native look of Qt applications. There used to be a gtk2 style, which used gtk calls directly to render natively looking Qt widgets, but it was moved from qtbase to qt5-styleplugins, because it cannot be used today in combination with gtk3.

For reasons mentioned above, we have been working on a Qt style to make Qt applications look natively in Gnome. This style is named adwaita-qt and from the name you can guess that it makes Qt applications look like Gtk applications with Adwaita style. Adwaita-qt is actually not a new project, it’s been there for years and it was developed by Martin Bříza. Unfortunately, Martin left Red Hat long time ago and since then a new version of Gnome’s Adwaita was released, completely changing colors and made the Adwaita theme look more modern. Being the one who takes care of these things nowadays, I started slowly updating adwaita-qt to make it look like the current Gnome Adwaita theme and voilà, a new version was released after 3 months of intermittent work. You can see the results here:

Isn’t it beatiful? The theme is far from being perfect and there will definitely be still some minor issues, but writting a Qt style is far from being an easy task as the QStyle class is quite complex. If you find any issue, you can open a bug and I will try to fix it. You can also send me patches if you decide to fix something yourself (I will be happy for that). The repository is hosted on GitHub under FedoraQt/adwaita-qt.

And of course it was a lie, the screenshots above are the old version of adwaita-qt (for comparison), the new ones are actually here:

I hope you like it more now :).

Gnome integration for Qt based applications in Flatpak

Following blog post from Patrick Griffis about new themes support in Flatpak, we started working on supporting this new feature too. Currently wherever you start a Qt application, it would always look like a KDE application or something would be missing, like icons so you would end up with bad experience and mixed feelings. This is going to change now as we now support Gnome in form of icons, widget style and Qt platform theme and with this, when you run a Qt application in Gnome, it will look definitely better and more natively than before. We packaged regular adwaita icons which are used by default in Gnome as extension of freedesktop runtime. For widget style we use adwaita-qt style, which is a Qt style attempting to look like Gtk’s adwaita and the most important part putting this all together is QGnomePlatform, a Qt platform theme which reads your Gnome configuration and applies it to running Qt applications. QGnomePlatform also enforces Qt apps to use adwaita icons and adwaita-qt style by default so that’s another reason why it is important. Both adwaita-qt and QGnomePlatform projects are by the way authored by Martin Bříza, a collegue of mine from Red Hat so if you meet him in person somewhere buy him a beer for that he cares about Qt integration in Gnome :). Now coming to a question how to install this and make it work. Basically all you need to do is install following extensions and you shold be done:

flatpak install kderuntime org.freedesktop.Platform.Icontheme.Adwaita
flatpak install kderuntime org.kde.KStyle.Adwaita
flatpak install kderuntime org.kde.PlatformTheme.QGnomePlatform

Your Qt apps running in flatpak should then automatically pick up all of these extensions without any further modification, same way it does automatically when you run it outside the sandbox. Simply done!. I’m also aware that there are more Gtk themes, like adwaita-dark or high-contrast, both are also available in form of Qt style and we will probably package them later, but at this point it is mostly proof of concept that this can be done and works nicely. You can follow our wiki page if you want more information about runtimes, repository with applications and so on and from me it’s all for now.

Btw. below you can see okular running in flatpak and using adwaita-qt style with adwaita icons.

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